City of Coeur d’Alene Stormwater Outfall Volume Reduction – Sanders Beach

Applicant – City of Coeur d’Alene

The City of Coeur d’Alene proposes installing treatment to remove discharge from the City’s stormwater outfalls. The goal of this project is to install stormwater storage/filter systems and/or vegetated swales to divert stormwater from the existing outfalls in this combined 76-acre urban drainage area. An engineering study will determine the best storage and filtration method for the site.

The City requests $200,000 for this outfall project. It would reduce phosphorus by 140 lbs per year, yielding 1,400 lb/10 years (in perpetuity) for a cost-benefit ratio of $140 lb per/10 years.

City of Kellogg Sustainable Stormwater Improvements – Hill Street Outfall

Applicant – City of Kellogg

The City of Kellogg proposes management improvements and treatment of stormwater. This proposal requests $65,000 of Leading Idaho funding and includes installing an in-line filtration system to treat stormwater before entering the Coeur d’Alene River. The project would reduce phosphorus by 10 lbs per year, yielding 100 lbs/10 years (in perpetuity) for a cost-benefit ratio of $650 per lb phosphorus per 10 years.

Northside Stormwater Drainage Improvements – Marmot Trail Road

Applicant – East Side Highway District

the East Side Highway District (ESHD) proposes road drainage improvements along the Marmot Trail, which discharges runoff to the north end of Coeur d’Alene Lake. The ESHD is requesting $14,100 of Leading Idaho funding. This project is an approximately 3,600-ft asphalt roadway with a very steep gradient. Erosion occurs in the roadside drainage ditches.

City of Kellogg Sustainable Stormwater Improvements – North Kellogg Outfall

Applicant – City of Kellogg

The City of Kellogg proposes management improvements and treatment of stormwater. This proposal requests $250,000 of Leading Idaho funding and includes installing an in-line filtration system to treat stormwater before entering the Coeur d’Alene River. This project would reduce phosphorus by 70 lbs per year, yielding 700 lbs/10 years (in perpetuity) for a cost-benefit ratio of $360 lb per 10 years.

City of Kellogg Sustainable Stormwater Improvements – Outfall to Bunker Creek

Applicant – City of Coeur d’Alene

The City of Kellogg proposes management improvements and treatment of stormwater. This proposal requests $200,000 of Leading Idaho funding, including installing a bioswale that would treat nearly thirty percent of the City’s stormwater. The project will result in an estimated reduction of phosphorus loads to Coeur d’Alene Lake by 130 lbs per year, yielding 1,300 lbs/10 years (in perpetuity) for a cost-benefit ratio of $150 per lb per 10 years.

City of Coeur d’Alene Stormwater Outfall Volume Reduction – Mullan Ave

Applicant – City of Coeur d’Alene

The City of Coeur d’Alene proposes installing treatment to remove discharge from the city’s stormwater outfalls. This project aims to install stormwater storage/filter systems and/or vegetated swales to divert stormwater from the existing outfalls in this 12-acres urban drainage area. An engineering study will determine the best storage and filtration method for the site.

This city requests $115,000 for this outfall project. It would reduce phosphorus by 20 lbs per year, yielding 200 lbs/10years (in perpetuity) for a cost-benefit ratio of $580 per lb phosphorus per 10 years,

Coeur d’Alene River Stabilization

Applicant – Kootenai-Shoshone Soil and Water Conservation District (SWCD)

The Kootenai-Shoshone Soil & Water Conservation District (KSSWCD) and the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) are working with three landowners near Kingston to stabilize 925 linear feet of eroding streambank on the Coeur d’Alene River. NRCS/KSSWCD will provide project engineering, oversight, and certification to ensure the proper installation of riparian plantings, willow-infused rock rip-rap, and stream barbs. KSSWCD requests $278,900 to complete this project and the bio-engineered bank stabilization.

Coeur of d’Alene Stormwater Outfall Volume Reduction – Independence Point

Applicant – City of Coeur d’Alene

The City of Coeur d’Alene proposes installing treatment to remove discharge from the city’s stormwater outfalls. This project aims to install stormwater storage/filter systems and/or vegetated swales to divert stormwater from the existing outfalls in this 131-acre urban drainage area. An engineering study will determine the best storage and filtration method for the site. The city is requesting $380,000 for this outfall project. It would reduce phosphorus by 235 lb per year, yielding 2,350 lbs/10years (in perpetuity) for a cost-benefit ratio of $160 per lb per 10 years.

Mica Creek Watershed Agricultural Sediment Reduction and Improvement Project Phase 2

Applicant – Kootenai-Shoshone Soil Water Conservation District

The Kootenai-Shoshone Soil & Water Conservation District and the Mundt family propose stabilizing 1600 feet of stream banks on Mica Creek, a tributary to Coeur d’Alene Lake. The applicant requests $49,000 from the Leading Idaho funds to remove collapsed vegetation, armor the banks, and replant willows to prevent further erosion, protecting Coeur d’Alene Lake’s existing fence and water quality. The project is “shovel ready,” has community support, and completion of this project would meet the 2023 timeframe.

City of Plummer and Stimson Lumber Company Municipal Wastewater Reuse Project

Applicant – City of Plummer

The City of Plummer proposes to allow Stimson Mill to use the City’s treated wastewater effluent for the mill’s non-potable uses. This proposal will request $300,000 from the Leading Idaho fund and will reduce phosphorus loads to Coeur d’Alene Lake by less than 100 pounds per year in perpetuity.

DEQ awards $2,466,450 to the Remington Recreational Water and Sewer District in Kootenai County

July 1, 2021

BOISE — The Idaho Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) today announced the award of a $2,466,450 low-interest drinking water construction loan to the Remington Recreational Water and Sewer District located in Kootenai County.

The funding will be used to complete transmission and distribution improvements and increase source, storage, and booster capacity.

The loan from DEQ’s State Revolving Loan Fund, which is capitalized annually by grants from the US Environmental Protection Agency, carries a simple 2.75% interest rate, is payable over 30 years. 

Staff Contact
MaryAnna Peavey
Grants & Loans Bureau Chief
MaryAnna.Peavey@deq.idaho.gov