Official Government Website

Industry-Specific Guidance

This page outlines environmental standards that pertain to specific industries in Idaho. DEQ’s role is to help businesses understand applicable regulations and comply with Idaho’s environmental laws, which results in more effective business operations and protects our state’s natural resources.

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Air Quality Regulations – Auto body shops can potentially emit air pollutants into the atmosphere and may be regulated by state and federal regulations. Using paint spray booths, boilers, incinerators, solvents, and degreasers are all activities that may need to be permitted.

Idaho General Air Permit to Construct – Depending on the volume of coating materials used per day, facilities in Idaho may be required to obtain from DEQ either a General Air Quality Permit to Construct for Automotive Coating Operations or an Air Quality Permit to Construct specific to the facility. (Exceptions may apply.)

  • State Air Quality Permit Guidelines for Automotive Coating Operations in Idaho

Related Federal Requirements – The Paint Stripping and Miscellaneous Surface Coating Operations- 40 CFR 63, Subpart HHHHHH, commonly called the Autobody Shop Rule, regulates emissions from paint stripping and miscellaneous surface coating operations. Requirements under Subpart 6H are incorporated into DEQ’s General Permit to Construct for Automotive Coating Operations.

Note: Even if your facility is exempt from federal permitting requirements of Subpart HHHHHH (40 CFR 63.11170 (a)(2)), it may still be subject to the state permitting requirement.

Hazardous Waste Regulations – Auto body shops generate regulated wastes through the variety of services they offer. Used paints and solvents are the most commonly generated hazardous wastes at auto body shops. Depending on the services offered, auto body shops may also generate other regulated wastes, such as used oil, lead-acid batteries, and antifreeze.  All of these wastes are regulated by the federal Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, which is administered by DEQ in Idaho. The requirements for managing these wastes vary based on the type and waste generated.  

  • See the Hazardous Waste page for more general information on hazardous waste management
  • See the Solvent Waste tab under the Common Business page for more information on solvent management
  • See the Used Oil page for more information on used oil management

Water Quality Regulations – Auto body shops can have an impact on Idaho’s surface and ground waters and may be subject to state water quality standards, federal water quality regulations, and the Idaho Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (IPDES) program. Under this program, DEQ regulates the discharge of pollutants into any water body of the United States (including storm water sewer systems beginning July 1, 2021). Depending on the activities and services provided, an auto body shop may need IPDES permit coverage for direct or indirect discharge. If the auto body shop is located within a city that has an IPDES permit, the shop may be subject to the city’s pretreatment and storm water requirements.

Even if permits are not required, any business conducting an activity with the potential to degrade the state’s aquifers must use appropriate best management practices and best practical methods to the maximum extent practical.

Air Quality Regulations – Auto repair shops conduct several activities that can potentially emit air pollutants into the atmosphere and may be regulated by state and federal regulations. Such activities can include the use of waste oil burners, boilers, and halogenated solvents.

Auto repair shops that provide painting and coating services may be required to obtain an Air Quality General Permit to Construct for Automotive Coating Operations or an Air Quality Permit to Construct specific to the facility. The type of permit required depends on the volume of coating materials used per day.

Hazardous Waste Regulations – Auto repair shops generate regulated wastes through the variety of services they offer. Used oil, solvents, lead-acid batteries, and antifreeze are the most commonly generated hazardous wastes at auto repair shops. If they offer auto body repair services, shops may also generate used paint.  All of these wastes are regulated by the federal Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, which is administered by DEQ in Idaho.  The requirements for managing these wastes vary based on the type and of waste generated. 

See the Hazardous Waste page for more general information on hazardous waste management (link to internal page).

See the Solvent Waste tab under the Common Business page for more information on solvent management (link to internal page).

See the Used Oil page for more information on used oil management (link to internal page).

Water Quality Regulations – Auto repair shops may have an impact on Idaho’s surface and ground waters and may be subject to state water quality standards, federal water quality regulations, and the Idaho Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (IPDES) program. Under this program, DEQ regulates the discharge of pollutants into any water body of the US (including storm water sewer systems beginning July 1, 2021). Depending on the activities and services provided, an auto repair shop may need IPDES permit coverage for direct or indirect discharge. If the auto repair shop is located within a city that has an IPDES permit, the shop may be subject to the city’s pretreatment and storm water requirements.

Even if permits are not required, any business conducting an activity with the potential to degrade the state’s aquifers must use appropriate best management practices and best practical methods to the maximum extent practical.

Air Quality Regulations – Construction activities impact Idaho’s air quality and are regulated by DEQ. All construction sites/projects must comply with DEQ’s fugitive dust and open burning regulations, and certain types of construction equipment may need to obtain an air quality permit to construct. Specific regulations also apply to rock crushers, concrete batch plants, and hot mix asphalt plants. In addition, the demolition of asbestos must meet the National Emission Standard for Asbestos (NESHAP).

Water Quality Regulations –  Construction operations can have an impact on Idaho’s surface and ground waters and may be subject to state water quality standards, federal water quality regulations, and the Idaho Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (IPDES) program. Under this program, DEQ regulates the discharge of pollutants into any water body of the United States (including storm water sewer systems beginning July 1, 2021). Depending on the activities and services provided, construction operations may need IPDES permit coverage for direct or indirect discharge. If the construction operation is located within a city that has an IPDES permit, it may be subject to the city’s pretreatment and storm water requirements.

Even if permits are not required, any business conducting an activity with the potential to degrade the state’s aquifers must use appropriate best management practices and best practical methods to the maximum extent practical.

Waste Management – Construction and demolition wastes must be disposed of at landfills approved to manage those types of materials. Contact the DEQ Solid Waste Program (link to internal page) or your local Public Health District to learn more about approved landfills. Asbestos and lead-based paint waste are of particular concern in renovation and demolition waste.  Asbestos must be disposed of at landfills that have been approved to accept asbestos. Contractors should confirm the landfill can accept asbestos waste before taking it there, and the landfill may have specific asbestos acceptance instructions that contractors must follow. DEQ’s hazardous waste program regulates lead-based paint debris. See Lead-Based Paint Debris (EDMS# 2018BCB9) for more information.

Some construction and demolition wastes, such as clean wood and concrete, can be recycled. Other items can be salvaged prior to demolition.  Fixtures, toilets, sinks, bathtubs, cabinets, doors, wood flooring, and appliances can be donated or sold for reuse. Learn more about building recycling and reuse at EPA’s Sustainable Management of Construction and Demolition Materials.

Dental offices generate hazardous wastes including amalgam scraps, waste mercury, fixers, developers, x-ray film packets, corrosive denture cleaners, cold sterilants, and chemiclave chemicals. Hazardous waste is subject to requirements under the federal Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, which is administered by DEQ in Idaho. The type and quantity of waste generated at a dental office will determine what specific regulations apply. Depending on the activities and services provided, dental offices may need IPDES permit coverage for direct or indirect discharge. If the dental office is located within a city that has an IPDES permit, it may be subject to the city’s pretreatment requirements. 

Air Quality Regulations – Dry cleaning operations use solvents and cleaners that may emit volatile organic compounds and hazardous air pollutants and may be subject to air quality rules and regulations.

Dry cleaners that use perchloroethylene (perc) are subject to federal standards called National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) that regulate 187 hazardous air pollutants from particular industrial sources.

Dry cleaners that use petroleum solvents may be subject to New Source Performance Standards. Dry cleaners that qualify as major sources under NESHAPs or NSPS are also subject to Clean Air Act Title V (Tier I) operating permits requirements.

Hazardous Waste Regulations – Dry cleaning operations typically generate hazardous waste and must comply with the federal Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Still bottoms, spent filters, and spent perc are a few examples of wastes that need to be handled and managed properly under RCRA. The type and number of requirements that must be complied with is based on the quantity and type of waste generated. 

Water Quality Regulations – Dry cleaning facilities can have an impact on Idaho’s surface and ground waters and may be subject to state water quality standards, federal water quality regulations, and the Idaho Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (IPDES) program. Under this program, DEQ regulates the discharge of pollutants into any water body of the United States (including storm water sewer systems beginning July 1, 2021). Depending on the activities and services provided, a dry cleaning facility may need IPDES permit coverage for direct or indirect discharge. If the facility is located within a city that has an IPDES permit, it may be subject to the city’s pretreatment and storm water requirements.

Even if permits are not required, any business conducting an activity with the potential to degrade the state’s aquifers must use appropriate best management practices and best practical methods to the maximum extent practical.

Air Quality Regulations – Electroplating and anodizing operations can potentially emit pollutants into the atmosphere and may be regulated by state and federal regulations. Operations may require an air quality permit to construct, which is required prior to construction or modification of buildings, structures, and installations that emit, or may emit, pollutants into the air.

Businesses that use chromium electroplating and anodizing tanks are regulated by the federal National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs). Facilities subject to the NESHAPs may also be required to obtain an air quality permit.

Hazardous Waste Regulations –  Electroplating and anodizing facilities typically generate hazardous waste and must comply with federal Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), which is administered by DEQ. Under RCRA, facilities that generate hazardous waste are required to follow specific practices and procedures associated with the safe management of hazardous waste. The type and number of requirements that must be complied with is based on the quantity and type of waste generated.

Water Quality Regulations – Electroplating and anodizing facilities can have an impact on Idaho’s surface and ground waters and may be subject to state water quality standards, federal water quality regulations, and the Idaho Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (IPDES) program. Under this program, DEQ regulates the discharge of pollutants into any water body of the United States (including storm water sewer systems beginning July 1, 2021). Depending on the activities and services provided, an electroplating and anodizing facility may need IPDES permit coverage for direct or indirect discharge. If the facility is located within a city that has an IPDES permit, it may be subject to the city’s pretreatment and storm water requirements.

Even if permits are not required, any business conducting an activity with the potential to degrade the state’s aquifers must use appropriate best management practices and best practical methods to the maximum extent practical.

Air Quality Regulations – Hot mix asphalt plants (HMAs) emit air pollutants into the atmosphere and may be regulated by state and federal regulations. HMAs typically require an air quality permit to construct. Hot mix asphalt facilities also must comply with DEQ’s fugitive dust, visible emissions, and open burning regulations. When relocating equipment, facilities must notify DEQ by completing a Portable Equipment Relocation Form.

Hazardous Waste Regulations – Hot mix asphalt plants can generate hazardous waste and must comply with the federal Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), which is administered by DEQ. Under RCRA, facilities that generate hazardous waste are required to follow specific practices and procedures associated with the safe management of hazardous waste. The type and number of requirements that must be complied with are based on the quantity and type of waste generated.

Water Quality Regulations – Hot mix asphalt plants can have an impact on Idaho’s surface and ground waters and may be subject to state water quality standards, federal water quality regulations, and the Idaho Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (IPDES) program. Under this program, DEQ regulates the discharge of pollutants into any water body of the United States (including storm water sewer systems beginning July 1, 2021). Depending on the activities and services provided, a hot mix asphalt plant may need IPDES permit coverage for direct or indirect discharge. If the plant is located within a city that has an IPDES permit, it may be subject to the city’s pretreatment and storm water requirements.

Even if permits are not required, any business conducting an activity with the potential to degrade the state’s aquifers must use appropriate best management practices and best practical methods to the maximum extent practical.

Air Quality Regulations – Printshops can potentially emit air pollutants and may be regulated by state and federal laws. Facilities that use solvents and inks that contain volatile organic compounds, hazardous air pollutants, and toxic air pollutants may need an air quality permit to construct.

Printshops that have publication rotogravure, product and packaging rotogravure, or wide-web flexographic printing presses and emit or have the potential to emit 10 tons per year or more of any hazardous air pollutants or 25 tons per year or more of any combination of hazardous air pollutants are subject to the federal National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs, Subpart KK). Facilities will also be required to obtain a Tier I operating permit.

Publication rotogravure printing presses that were constructed, modified, or reconstructed after October 28, 1980, are subject to the federal New Source Performance Standards: Standards of Performance for the Graphic Arts Industry: Publication Rotogravure Printing, Subpart QQ.

Hazardous Waste Regulations – Printshops can typically generate hazardous wastes through the variety of services they offer. Used inks, waste rags, and solvents are just a few examples of wastes that need to be handled and managed properly. Management of hazardous waste is regulated by the federal Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), which is administered by DEQ. The types and number of requirements that must be complied with is based on the quantity and types of waste generated. 

Water Quality Regulations – Print shops can have an impact on Idaho’s surface and ground waters and may be subject to state water quality standards, federal water quality regulations, and the Idaho Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (IPDES) program. Under this program, DEQ regulates the discharge of pollutants into any water body of the United States (including storm water sewer systems beginning July 1, 2021). Depending on the activities and services provided, a print shop may need IPDES permit coverage for direct or indirect discharge. If the shop is located within a city that has an IPDES permit, it may be subject to the city’s pretreatment and storm water requirements.

Even if permits are not required, any business conducting an activity with the potential to degrade the state’s aquifers must use appropriate best management practices and best practical methods to the maximum extent practical.

Air Quality Regulations  – Air quality regulations that impact portable rock crushing facilities include New Source Performance Standards, Permit by Rule, and Portable Equipment Relocation Registration. Portable rock crushers also must comply with DEQ’s fugitive dust, visible emissions, and open burning regulations.

Hazardous Waste Regulations – Portable rock crushers can generate hazardous waste and must comply with the federal Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), which is administered by DEQ. Under RCRA, facilities that generate hazardous waste are required to follow specific practices and procedures associated with the safe management of hazardous waste. The type and number of requirements that must be complied with are based on the quantity and type of waste generated.

Water Quality Regulations – Portable rock crushers can have an impact on Idaho’s surface and ground waters and may be subject to state water quality standards, federal water quality regulations, and the Idaho Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (IPDES) program. Under this program, DEQ regulates the discharge of pollutants into any water body of the United States (including storm water sewer systems beginning July 1, 2021). Depending on the activities and services provided, a portable rock crushing facility may need IPDES permit coverage for direct or indirect discharge. If the facility is located within a city that has an IPDES permit, it may be subject to the city’s pretreatment and storm water requirements.

Even if permits are not required, any business conducting an activity with the potential to degrade the state’s aquifers must use appropriate best management practices and best practical methods to the maximum extent practical.

Air Quality Regulations – Salvage yards conduct several activities that can potentially emit air pollutants into the atmosphere and may be regulated by state and federal regulations. Such activities can include the use of waste oil burners, refrigerant evacuation, open burning, and odors generated from residual fuel handling. 

Open Burning of Trade Waste or Demolition Debris is Prohibited – The “Rules for the Control of Air Pollution in Idaho” (IDAPA 58.01.01.600-617) prohibit open burning of trade waste. This includes all waste materials generated while operating a business in Idaho.

Use of Used Oil Burners is a Regulated Activity – Depending on the heat rating and source of the used oil burner, a permit, oil testing, or other periodic documentation may be required. See the “Rules for the Control of Air Pollution in Idaho” (IDAPA 58.01.01.222.02.h) for specific requirements.

Odors Must Be Controlled – IDAPA 58.01.01.775 limits the emission of odorous gases, liquids, or solids to quantities below levels that would cause air pollution.

Refrigerants Must Be Recovered – Under the federal Clean Air Act, it is illegal to vent any ozone depleting substance or its substitute; refrigerants should be recovered into a registered recovery device. This requirement is administered by the US Environmental Protection Agency.

Hazardous Waste Requirements – Salvage yards typically generate hazardous wastes through the variety of services they offer. Used batteries, antifreeze, mercury switches, oil, solvents, and other waste fluids are just a few examples of wastes that need to be handled and managed properly.  Management of hazardous waste is regulated by the federal Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), which is administered by DEQ.  The types and number of requirements that must be complied with are based on the quantity and type of waste generated.

Solid Waste Regulations – Salvage yards that generate waste tires are required to store, transport, and dispose of the tires properly.

Water Quality Regulations – Salvage yards can impact Idaho’s surface and ground waters and may be subject to state water quality standards, federal water quality regulations, and the Idaho Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) program. Under this program, DEQ regulates the discharge of pollutants into any water body of the United States (including storm water sewer systems beginning July 1, 2021). As a result, salvage yards may be required to have an industrial storm water permit. If the auto salvage yard is located within a city that has an IPDES permit, the shop may be subject to the city’s pretreatment and storm water requirements.

Even if permits are not required, any business conducting an activity with the potential to degrade the state’s aquifers must use appropriate best management practices and best practical methods to the maximum extent practical.

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