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Idaho Department of Environmental Quality

SRF-funded wastewater facility upgrades will save Coeur d'Alene 858,100kW-hr of energy a year

September 20, 2017

By DEQ Grants and Loans Program

Upgrades to the city of Coeur d’Alene wastewater treatment plant will save the city almost 858,100kW-hr and $55,860 per year. The energy savings is equal to the total annual power needs of 70 homes or the annual lighting needs of 700 residences.

The upgrades were made possible with a low-interest loan from the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality State Revolving Fund (SRF). The SRF loan process emphasizes reductions to operations and maintenance costs.

The savings come from the installation of energy-efficient 'green' options the city chose to fund when upgrading their wastewater treatment facility, in lieu of the more energy-intensive alternatives available. Substantial cost savings from reduced energy bills will rapidly offset the initial cost difference of the 'green' components. Coeur d’Alene can expect over $2.2 million in cost savings over the 40-year life of the facility due to the energy-efficient treatment of city wastewater.

Investigation required by the SRF Green Project Reserve Program revealed opportunities to upgrade the system that would provide additional energy and money savings. City consultants recommended installing a combination of fine bubble aerators, high speed turbo blowers, and dissolved oxygen control, to reduce aeration power demand by approximately 71 percent.

In addition, all new pumps and blowers were equipped with Variable Frequency Drives and premium energy-efficient motors to conserve energy and enhance the operability of the treatment process.

To learn more about grants and loans available to wastewater and drinking water systems, visit our Grants and Loans webpage.

DEQ-funded drinking water system upgrades will save Ashton over $35,000 a year

September 20, 2017

By DEQ Grants and Loans Program

ASHTON - Upgrades to the City of Ashton drinking water system will save the city almost 174,000kWh of energy and 21,700,000 gallons of water every year, also resulting in annual cost savings of over $35,000. The upgrades were made possible with a low-interest loan from the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality State Revolving Fund (SRF). The SRF loan process emphasizes reductions to operations and maintenance costs.

The savings comes from the installation of energy-efficient 'green' options the city chose to fund when upgrading their drinking water system. Substantial cost savings from reduced energy bills will rapidly offset the initial cost difference of the 'green' components. Ashton can expect many subsequent years of continued cost savings due to the installation of energy-efficient and water conserving drinking water technologies.

Investigation required by the SRF’s Green Project Reserve Program revealed opportunities to upgrade Ashton’s drinking water system that would provide water and energy conservation. The city’s consultants recommended replacing malfunctioning water meters with an automatic meter reading system to conserve water and save on treatment and pumping costs, installing a variable frequency drive on an existing pump to ensure operation at optimum speeds thereby minimizing energy, and replacing 12,600 feet of leaking distribution pipe saving over 17,000,000 gallons of treated water each year.

To learn more about grants and loans available to wastewater and drinking water systems, visit our Grants and Loans webpage.
 

Energy-efficient drinking water system upgrades will save Bonneville County homeowners association over $20,000 a year

May 30, 2017

By DEQ Grants and Loans Program Staff

Upgrades to the BlackHawk Estates/Iron Rim Ranch drinking water supply system are expected to save the community over $20,000 per year. The upgrades were made possible with a low-interest loan from the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality State Revolving Fund (SRF).

Investigation required by the SRF’s Green Project Reserve Program revealed opportunities to upgrade the drinking water system that would provide energy and money savings.

An in-depth engineering review by the community’s consultant indicated that switching power service to an off-peak schedule and installing a new water storage tank enabling nighttime and weekend pumping operations would reduce power costs for the system by up to 75%.

The community switched to the recommended off-peak schedule, taking advantage of power rates that are approximately one-half of the peak weekday rates. Funded by the SRF loan, Blackhawk Estates/Iron Rim Ranch installed a new water tank, sized larger than necessary for storage requirements, to enabled the recommended nighttime and weekend pumping operations. This new schedule eliminated the power company demand charge, which was half of the current power rate.

For more information on the Green Project Reserve Program, visit www.deq.idaho.gov/water-quality/grants-loans/green-project-reserve

 

SRF-funded energy-efficient wastewater treatment plant upgrade saves town over $300,000 a year

March 30, 2017

By Aimee Hill, Outreach and Environmental Coordinator, Grants and Loans

Upgrades to the City of Fruitland wastewater treatment plant will save the city almost 3,090,600 kilowatt-hours and $300,000 per year. The 2015 upgrades were made possible with a low-interest loan from the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality State Revolving Fund (SRF). The SRF loan process emphasizes reductions to operations and maintenance costs.

The savings largely come from installing energy-efficient “green” options the city chose to fund when upgrading its wastewater treatment facility, in lieu of the more energy-intensive alternatives available.

Investigation required by the SRF’s Green Project Reserve Program revealed opportunities to upgrade Fruitland’s wastewater system that would provide additional energy and money savings. The city installed a low-pressure, high-intensity ultraviolet system along with a tertiary filter to reduce disinfection power requirements, premium energy-efficient blowers and pumps, and an advanced computer-based monitoring and control system to minimize power costs of the new plant while optimizing treatment effectiveness.

Substantial cost savings from reduced energy bills will rapidly offset the initial cost difference of the green components, and Fruitland can expect many years of continued cost savings due to the energy-efficient treatment of the city’s wastewater.

To learn more about the Green Project Reserve Program, visit www.deq.idaho.gov/water-quality/grants-loans/green-project-reserve.

DEQ wastewater loan helped fund City of Weiser upgrades, saving town over $45,000 a year

December 21, 2016

By Kevin McNeill, DEQ Loan Program

Upgrades to the City of Weiser wastewater treatment plant will save the city almost 665,000 kilowatt-hours and $45,000 per year. The upgrades were made possible with a low-interest loan from the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality State Revolving Fund (SRF).

 

The savings come from installing energy-efficient “green” options the city chose to fund when upgrading its wastewater treatment facility in lieu of the more energy-intensive alternatives available. Substantial cost savings from reduced energy bills will rapidly offset the initial cost difference of the green components. Weiser can expect many subsequent years of continued cost savings due to the energy-efficient treatment of the city’s wastewater.

Investigation required by the SRF’s Green Project Reserve Program revealed opportunities to upgrade Weiser’s wastewater system that would provide additional energy and money savings. The city’s consultants recommended installing fine bubble diffusers with automated dissolved oxygen control and premium energy-efficient blowers and pumps equipped with variable frequency drives to ensure the equipment operated at optimum speeds, saving energy and reducing mechanical stress.

To learn more about grants and loans available to wastewater and drinking water systems, visit our Grants and Loans webpage.

DEQ provides funding opportunities for drinking water and wastewater systems

October 19, 2016

By Aimee Hill, Outreach and Environmental Coordinator, Grants and Loans

Each year, DEQ provides funding opportunities, in the form of grants or loans, to certain eligible drinking water and wastewater systems that are contributing to public health issues. These funds can be used to improve water quality or address infrastructure challenges.

Planning grants provide up to 50% of the cost of project design and construction planning activities (with the grantee providing a matching share from local sources). Grants awarded under this program must be used entirely to prepare facility plans that identify the most cost-effective, environmentally sound methods to upgrade eligible water and wastewater systems to achieve and maintain compliance with state and federal standards. 

DEQ’s loan funds provide low-interest funding—up to 100% of project costs—to design and construct system improvements. Loans also may be awarded to address nonpoint source pollution control activities such as pollutant trading, upgrading or replacing individual septic tanks, restoring wetlands, treating and controlling stormwater, and addressing agricultural runoff. Repayment terms are between 20 and 30 years, and a portion of the loan repayment may be waived.

Do you know a system that may be interested? 

The first step is for a system to call and discuss with the local DEQ regional office staff any issues it may be facing. Next, the system should notify DEQ in writing by submitting a letter of interest (LOI) form to DEQ by January 13, 2017. The LOI form is available here or the DEQ regional offices. Even if a system is on the current (2017) priority list, it still must submit the LOI form for the upcoming year (2018).

After the LOI submission deadline, projects are rated using standardized criteria. All rated systems are then comparatively ranked with other systems around the state. The rankings are compiled in the DEQ grant and loan priority lists. These lists help DEQ determine which projects we can provide financial assistance to, as the demand currently exceeds available funds. Those systems that rank highest and are ready to proceed are notified that they are eligible to apply for a grant or loan at the beginning of the next fiscal year (July 1, 2017). The map below shows the total funding by county over the past 15 years.

To learn more about the LOI process, access the forms, and find your regional office contact, visit the Drinking Water and Wastewater Grants and Loans Letter of Interest Forms for FY 18 webpage.

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